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External enclosure backup strategy (Read 12132 times)
Doc Sarvis
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External enclosure backup strategy
May 21st, 2005 at 3:11pm
 
I'm new to the board and I'm trying to get a backup strategy going for Ghost 2003, using XP SP1 as the O/S.  Following what seems like the best advice on the board, I plan to use the DOS interface for imaging and restores.

I want to use an external enclosure with either Firewire or USB.  I have USB ports on my mobo, but I wouldn't mind installing a firewire card if necessary.  Does anyone have recommendations for a drive enclosure solution that will minimize compatibility issues with Ghost 2003 in DOS mode(on an XP system)?  I have an 80GB drive part. to C at 20GB (8GB used) and F at 60GB (45GB used).  All are NTFS.  I know El Pescador has posted several work arounds for driver problems, but if possible I'll just buy equipment that will work from the start.  I'm new to imaging and Ghost but I have a working knowledge of DOS from my Win 3.1 days.  I can use Fdisk. 

Any advice would be much appreciated.  Thanks!
 
 
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El_Pescador
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Re: External enclosure backup strategy
Reply #1 - May 21st, 2005 at 4:16pm
 
Quote:
"... I have USB ports on my mobo, but I wouldn't mind installing a firewire card if necessary.  Does anyone have recommendations for a drive enclosure solution that will minimize compatibility issues with Ghost 2003 in DOS mode(on an XP system)?"

Doc Sarvis

The Intel USB host controller drivers typically found on motherboards can cause greater expense to rectify than employing a communications tactic using tomorrow's technology rather than that from yesterday; the SATA hardware of the future will be backwards compatible just like USB 2.0 hardware is with USB 1.1:

USB 2.0 = 480 Mbps (megaBITS per second)=60 MB/s (megaBYTES per second)

FireWire 400 = 400 Mbps (megaBITS per second)

FireWire 800 = 800 Mbps (megaBITS per second)

SATA = 1,500 Mbps (megaBITS per second)

SATA II = 3,000 Mbps (megaBITS per second)

SATA III =6,000 Mbps (megaBITS per second)

SATA has no host controller/device controller baggage like either USB 2.0 or FireWire, i.e., a PC system categorizes both USB and FireWire devices as external whereas an external SATA device - despite its own power supply and its own cooling fan - is regarded as internal. BTW, you can readily boot from an internal SATA HDD mounted in an external enclosure kit as referred to below - try to do that without major USB issues or minor FireWire issues.  So, for those willing to "think outside the box", consider the following:

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=12157...

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-Details.asp?EdpNo=12224...

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=12049...

http://www.directron.com/serialslot.html


This last item is for those who are fortunate to already have SATA ports on their respective MOBOs as they have no need for the first item.  All of the items suggested above and below should prove useful with your next PC.

For those who already have a spare serviceable IDE/ATA HDD onhand, consider the peculiar enclosure kit in the threads referenced below that connects via SATA and USB 2.0 both (albeit unlike SATA, USB 2.0 is somewhat hobbled in the DOS mode):

http://radified.com/cgi-bin/YaBB/YaBB.cgi?board=general;action=display;num=11161...

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=12158...


El Pescador
 

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