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Error EC8F17B7 (Read 13435 times)
revloc8
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Re: Error EC8F17B7
Reply #15 - Mar 21st, 2007 at 2:07am
 
Wow. You really go out of your way to not only solve the problem, but give additional info as well. I have only experienced such great advice and info on one other forum (silentpcreview.com).
Yea, I have SpeedFan installed, but as you know, it doesnt give very specific info. The fitness on both of my hdds is one bar short of the best and the performance is max on both; so at first I was a little skeptical that one of my hdds was the culprit. Live and learn Smiley
I'll have to give that other program a try. My wife just told me I could do "whatever it takes" to get the comp 100% stable...Acronis True Image...? hehe
 
 
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John.
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Re: Error EC8F17B7
Reply #16 - Mar 21st, 2007 at 9:38am
 
Thanks for the comments.  There are a lot of sharp contributors here.  We're all learning.

I was reading up on bad sectors for my own edification.  I have a Seagate drive so I was looking on their website for diagnostic tools.  I found this article which covers how to handle (and repair) bad sectors with Seagate.  I haven't run it yet myself, but here is the SeaTools document.

Quote:
Bad sectors (LBAs) may be detected during the test. The test will halt with a Fail status. If you are testing an internal PATA (IDE) or SATA disc drive, in this case, we recommend that you run the Long Test in the bootable version, SeaTools for DOS, which has the ability to repair sectors in most cases.

 

Ghost4me  Ghost 9, 10, 12, 14, 15.  Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7
 
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Pleonasm
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Re: Error EC8F17B7
Reply #17 - Mar 21st, 2007 at 12:34pm
 
Ghost4me, I have wondered:  when a drive marks a sector as bad and ‘substitutes’ another in its place, then replacement sectors that are logically adjacent to existing sectors (i.e., have sequential addresses) are now no longer necessarily physically adjacent to one another on the disk.  As a consequence, it seems that a defragmentation utility seeking to place a file in logically sequential sectors will in fact be fragmenting the file, under conditions where the file occupies one of the replacement sectors.

Your perspectives on this issue?
 

ple • o • nasm n. “The use of more words than are required to express an idea”
 
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John.
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Re: Error EC8F17B7
Reply #18 - Mar 21st, 2007 at 1:24pm
 
I believe the answer is "That depends".  If the defrag program reads the defective sector information in the partition table (I think that's where it is kept), and thus avoids placing any file across adjacent sectors, it could keep everything physically adjacent.

In reality, one or just a few bad sectors isn't normally a big performance issue.

It would be nice if there were a utility that would display all the bad sector information and what file-names fall across that sector.  Is there something like that?

Note, I created a new thread entitled How does Ghost 9/10 deal with bad-sectors? to discuss bad-sector issues.
 

Ghost4me  Ghost 9, 10, 12, 14, 15.  Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7
 
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Pleonasm
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Re: Error EC8F17B7
Reply #19 - Mar 21st, 2007 at 6:34pm
 
Yes, I agree that it “would be nice if there were a utility that would display all the bad sector information and what file-names fall across that sector” – but have never seen such a tool.  Perhaps another forum member will be able to comment on this point.

I was under the impression (and could be wrong) that the defective sector information is stored in non-volatile memory within the resident electronics on the hard disk drive itself – i.e., the existence of a replaced (swapped) bad sector is completely transparent whenever the operating system or an application makes a disk read/write request.

An interesting discussion, but one that I agree is largely without any significant performance implications.
 

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John.
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Re: Error EC8F17B7
Reply #20 - Mar 21st, 2007 at 10:53pm
 
Pleonasm wrote on Mar 21st, 2007 at 6:34pm:
I was under the impression (and could be wrong) that the defective sector information is stored in non-volatile memory within the resident electronics on the hard disk drive itself – i.e., the existence of a replaced (swapped) bad sector is completely transparent whenever the operating system or an application makes a disk read/write request.

I think you're right and I was wrong about where the bad sector information is kept.  It appears from this PC Guide Article that the drive controller handles the remapping.
 

Ghost4me  Ghost 9, 10, 12, 14, 15.  Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7
 
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