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Ghost 12 restore results with Vista (Read 38400 times)
John.
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Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Sep 23rd, 2007 at 5:46pm
 
I responded to a thread in the Ghost 2003 board regarding Ghost 2003/Ghost 8.2 and Windows Vista.  However I thought it might be helpful if placed here where Ghost 12 and Vista users might more readily see (and comment on) my test results.

I just tested restoring a Ghost 12 Vista backup onto a spare SATA harddrive that I was using on an XP pc (data volume not c: ).  

1. I deleted the partitions in XP, so it was empty.
2. I shutdown my Vista pc, and disconnected the 2 internal sata drives.
3. I connected my empty xp sata drive.
4. I booted from the Ghost 12 cd.
5. I selected "Restore my Computer".  Ghost 12 showed a menu of restore points (backup images) that I have stored on my external USB2 hard drive.
6,. I selected the latest c: Vista partition backup.
7. At this point I saw the options that Ghost 12 would use.  A couple things caught my attention:

* There was an option called "Restore original disk signature".  It seems that Symantec has fixed the problems with disk signatures.
* There was an option called "Restore Anywhere - not licensed" which was NOT checked.  I have no idea what this is, but must be a new feature coming in the future.  
* Restore MBR was NOT checked.  I suspect the reason for this is that my Vista c: backup is of ONLY the c: partition.  I have another partition on the physical hard drive.  I think if I had done a complete "Backup My Computer" backup with Ghost 12, it would restore everything.
* In fact, I couldn't modify any of the options.
[Edit:  I was using a ps2 keyboard connected to an add-in card on the Dell, so believe it is possible that the keyboard was not detected by the boot cd.  Will have to re-test that next time with usb keyboard.]
* Auto Validation was also checked.  That's a nice touch.

8. The restore took 11 minutes.
9. I exited Ghost 12 cd, and rebooted.
10. Vista started up normally (well it did give a message that it hadn't shut down properly and did I want safe mode or normal.  I selected normal)
11. Everything worked just fine in Vista from Ghost 12 restore.

Afterwards, I shut down and connected the restored Vista drive, back to the XP computer as a data drive ( d: ) and booted xp.

I started Partition Magic 8 to see if I could see what cylinder the partition was on.  PM8 immediately gave me an error message saying disk format was invalid!  (From that I would conclude that PM8 is NOT "vista certified").  

I finally used the Terabyte PartInfo utility successfully to analyze my restored Vista drive (now attached to the xp system) as well as to analyze my original Vista partition on Dell.

1. The XP c: drive has 63 Hidden sectors (I believe that means it starts on sector 63)
2. The XP d: drive (the Vista restore created by Ghost 12) has 63 hidden sectors.  Not sure why Ghost 12 relocated it from 2048.  (Perhaps if I had wiped the SATA drive first, Ghost would have placed the restored partition at 2048.  At least it works as is without any intervention.)

3. The original Dell Vista c: partition has 2048 hidden sectors (i.e. an offset of 2048).

Conclusion:  I had expected to have needed to perform a Vista boot repair or edit the bcd because the "restore MBR" option was not checked.  I assume that Ghost 12 must have automatically written a MBR on the drive.  At any rate, Ghost 12 obviously understood the Vista drive layout during the restore.

Another interesting fact about the Ghost 12 restore:  The c: Vista partition (on a Dell pc) is the 3rd partition on the physical hard drive.  However, it restored this 3rd partition to the 1st partition position on the clean/blank SATA drive; and it booted.  

The first partition is a Dell utility partition
The second partition is the Dell Recovery partition
The third partition is the Vista c: drive
The fourth partition is one I created by shrinking the c: partition, a d: data partition

In the past, it was necessary to edit boot.ini to "fix up" the boot process so it works.  Now Ghost 12 took care of everything automatically.

By the way, the sata drive had never been used as a boot device in XP, only as a secondary data volume.  And before I used the drive I checked with PM8 (under xp) and it said "First physical sector 63" for drive properties.  

My confidence of being able to restore my Vista Ghost 12 backup is good at this point.
 

Ghost4me  Ghost 9, 10, 12, 14, 15.  Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7
 
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #1 - Sep 29th, 2007 at 3:21pm
 
Continuing from   http://radified.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1170184062/105#115

John, it's my understanding that if Vista is installed to an empty HD then the partition offset is 2048 sectors. This offset is only seen when Vista creates the partition. If you create the partition yourself and then install Vista to the partition, the offset is 63 sectors.

Quote:
The original Dell Vista c: partition has 2048 hidden sectors (i.e. an offset of 2048).

How did you determine this? I thought the offset related to the sectors from LBA-0. I'm confused as Vista was the third physical partition on the HD.

ptedit can be downloaded from 

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/tools/pq/utilities/

(Third from bottom)


 
 
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #2 - Sep 29th, 2007 at 4:00pm
 
I've just read that ptedit32.exe will run in Vista. (same download site)
 
 
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John.
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #3 - Sep 29th, 2007 at 5:50pm
 
PTEdit does not run in Vista, but I got PTEdit32 to work.

It is confusing.  Here is the output from PTEdit for original Dell Vista PC:

...


Here is the output from Terabyte PartInfo utility

PARTINFW 1.10
Copyright (c) 1996-2006 TeraByte, Inc.  All rights reserved.

Run date: 09/23/2007 14:40

====================================================================
          MBR Partition Information (HD0 - 0x18000000)
                        (CHS: 1023/254/63)
+====+====+=============+====+=============+===========+===========+
| 0: |  0 |    0   1  1 | de |    5 254 63 |        63 |     96327 |
| 1: |  0 |    6  30 25 |  7 | 1023 254 63 |     98304 |  20971520 |
| 2: | 80 | 1023 254 63 |  7 | 1023 254 63 |  21069824 | 322048000 |
| 3: |  0 | 1023 254 63 |  f | 1023 254 63 | 343117824 | 282021888 |
+====+====+=============+====+=============+===========+===========+
                        Volume Information
+----+----+-------------+----+-------------+-----------+-----------+
| 0: |  0 | 1023 254 63 |  7 | 1023 254 63 |      2048 | 282019840 |
| 1: |  0 |    0   0  0 |  0 |    0   0  0 |         0 |         0 |
| 2: |  0 |    0   0  0 |  0 |    0   0  0 |         0 |         0 |
| 3: |  0 |    0   0  0 |  0 |    0   0  0 |         0 |         0 |
           MBR Partition Information (HD0) Continued:
+====+====+=============+====+=============+===========+===========+
+====+====+=============+====+=============+===========+===========+
                          BOOT SECTOR INFORMATION
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
File System ID: 0x7   LBA: 98304  Total Sectors: 20971520   ID: 0x2
                         Jump: EB 52 90
                     OEM Name: NTFS    
                Bytes Per Sec: 512
                Sec Per Clust: 8
                  Res Sectors: 0
                       Zero 1: 0x0
                       Zero 2: 0x0
                         NA 1: 0x0
                        Media: 0xF8
                       Zero 3: 0x0
                Sec Per Track: 63
                        Heads: 255
                  Hidden Secs: 98304
                         NA 2: 0x0
                         NA 3: 0x800080
                Total Sectors: 0x013FFFFF
                      MFT LCN: 0x0D5555
                 MFT Mirr LCN: 0x013FFFF
                Clust Per FRS: 0xF6
             Clust Per IBlock: 0x1
                    Volume SN: 0x42A42E66A42E5D23
                     Checksum: 0x0
                    Boot Flag: 0xAA55
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
File System ID: 0x7   LBA: 21069824  Total Sectors: 322048000   ID: 0x3
                         Jump: EB 52 90
                     OEM Name: NTFS    
                Bytes Per Sec: 512
                Sec Per Clust: 8
                  Res Sectors: 0
                       Zero 1: 0x0
                       Zero 2: 0x0
                         NA 1: 0x0
                        Media: 0xF8
                       Zero 3: 0x0
                Sec Per Track: 63
                        Heads: 255
                  Hidden Secs: 21069824
                         NA 2: 0x0
                         NA 3: 0x800080
                Total Sectors: 0x013320FF0
                      MFT LCN: 0x0CCC0AA
                 MFT Mirr LCN: 0x01338182
                Clust Per FRS: 0xF6
             Clust Per IBlock: 0x1
                    Volume SN: 0xE004313E43118CC
                     Checksum: 0x0
                    Boot Flag: 0xAA55
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
File System ID: 0x7   LBA: 343119872  Total Sectors: 282019840
                         Jump: EB 52 90
                     OEM Name: NTFS    
                Bytes Per Sec: 512
                Sec Per Clust: 8
                  Res Sectors: 0
                       Zero 1: 0x0
                       Zero 2: 0x0
                         NA 1: 0x0
                        Media: 0xF8
                       Zero 3: 0x0
                Sec Per Track: 63
                        Heads: 255
                  Hidden Secs: 2048
                         NA 2: 0x0
                         NA 3: 0x800080
                Total Sectors: 0x010CF47FF
                      MFT LCN: 0x0B34DAA
                 MFT Mirr LCN: 0x010CF47F
                Clust Per FRS: 0xF6
             Clust Per IBlock: 0x1
                    Volume SN: 0xF8D07646D0760B60
                     Checksum: 0x0
                    Boot Flag: 0xAA55
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

Ghost4me  Ghost 9, 10, 12, 14, 15.  Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7
 
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Brian
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #4 - Sep 30th, 2007 at 12:51am
 
John, that's too hard for me. Partitions 2, 3 and 4 are not starting on cylinder boundaries as we are used to seeing. But they do end on cylinder boundaries. Vista does this.
We are used to seeing partitions starting on Head 0, Sector 1. (Apart from the first primary partition which is Head 1, Sector 1)

The logical volume commencing at LBA: 343119872 has 2048 hidden sectors and this is typical of a logical volume created in Vista.

http://www.multibooters.co.uk/partitions.html

It's going to take time for this to sink into my brain.
 
 
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #5 - Sep 30th, 2007 at 1:29am
 
Brian, as I mentioned earlier this is the Dell pc as delivered from Dell (except I split the 3rd Vista partition into two partitions)
1. Hidden diagnostic partition
2. Dell Recovery partition
3. Vista primary partition
4. Vista partition

The interesting thing about restoring the Vista Primary Partition (3rd one) onto a old SATA drive which I deleted the xp partitions, is that I ONLY restored the Vista Primary Partition.  and yet the old SATA drive booted fine without any intervention or repairs etc.  

That's a lot better than all the lengthy threads I have been following on the TI forum regarding offsets and repairs and TI.

I'm still not sure why Powerquest tool shows slightly different numbers than the Terabyte partition display tool for the same physical hard drive.
 

Ghost4me  Ghost 9, 10, 12, 14, 15.  Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7
 
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #6 - Sep 30th, 2007 at 5:39am
 
"The interesting thing about restoring the Vista Primary Partition (3rd one) onto a old SATA drive which I deleted the xp partitions, is that I ONLY restored the Vista Primary Partition.  and yet the old SATA drive booted fine without any intervention or repairs etc.

That's a lot better than all the lengthy threads I have been following on the TI forum regarding offsets and repairs and TI."


There seems to be a widespread misconception that the partition structure/location requirements are different for Vista vs. XP/earlier.  That's not so.  Vista works just fine in "normal" (let's call it legacy) partitions.  There is no mystery that a restored Vista partition should work in a legacy partition.  An image of a Vista OS partition, regardless of whether the original was 2048-offset or 63-offset, can be restored and work just fine on another partition, whether 2048- or 63-offset, or even something entirely different.  We all know an image of an XP partition can be restored to a different location on a disk, and the principle is the same here.  It doesn't matter what the offsets of the source or the target are.

What is different is the location of partitions that are created with the Vista partitioning programs.  It's important to separate this concept from Vista itself--don't think of it as a feature/requirement of Vista, it's a characteristic of the partitioning utility.  The Vista operating system doesn't care whether it's a 2048-offset or a 63-offset partition.  IOW, you can create a legacy partition with XP, PM8, or even fdisk, and Vista can be installed in that pre-created partition without any problem.  If you're creating the partition during the Vista install, however, then you're using the Vista partitioning utility, and that does not create legacy partitions.  Either way, the OS doesn't care.

Legacy partitions begin and end on cylinder boundaries.  "Cylinders" are a virtual concept, and have had no real meaning since the advent of IDE hard disks around a decade and a half ago.  The one exception to the cylinder-boundary rule is when the beginning of a cylinder needs to have a partition table, such as the very beginning of the disk (space needed for MBR/partition table) or the beginning of a logical partition (space needed for extended partition table--what PM8 refers to as an EPBR).  In those cases, the following partition starts one "track" (another virtual concept) later.  Most disk manufacturers implement the notion of tracks with 63 sectors--hence, the familiar 63-sector offset practice to which we have all become accustomed.

But remember, the notion of cylinders and tracks has been obsolete for a long time, and disks have just been faking it all these years.  Utilities like PM8, ptedit, and partinfo, as well as nearly every other utility in the world, have continued the charade to avoid upsetting old operating systems.  The Vista disk partitioner simply says to heck with old operating systems and abandons the concept altogether.

Rather than cylinders and tracks, think of the Vista partitioner as using units or blocks of 2048 sectors.  (Assorted TI threads have links to the Microsoft pages attempting to explain how they came up with 2048, but that's not important here.  The important thing is Vista can use anything, and Microsoft has settled on 2048, like it or not.)  The Vista partitioner will create partitions that align on 2048-sector blocks.  If a block has a partition table, the following partition will begin one block--2048 sectors--later.  Pretty simple.

Now, what's confusing everyone is that legacy utilities will continue to display partition information as though they were legacy partitions, with cylinders and tracks.  They're not wrong, but it is confusing.  They're not wrong because disks still use legacy partition tables (for now), so the Vista partitioner has to create those (ahem) "wrong" numbers to put in the legacy partition table.  So the Vista partitioner manufactures numbers than look wrong, puts them in the partition table, the legacy tools read those numbers, and show them to you.  No wonder you get confused.

This is a long-winded way of saying you don't need to avoid the legacy tools, but you do need to understand what they are showing you.  The only numbers that are really relevant are the sector-offset and partition size.  Sector-offset is denoted as "Sectors Before" in ptedit and "Hidden Sectors" in PartInfo.  The size of the partition in sectors is shown as "Sectors" in ptedit and "Total Sectors" in PartInfo.

For an illustration of how this all plays out, let's consider Ghost4me's original Dell hard disk.

The first primary partition was created with a legacy utility.  We know the MBR/partition table is on cyl/hd/sec 0/0/1.  (Remember, it's still a legacy partition table, so it's going to show cyl/head/sec values, even though the numbers are imaginary).  That means the first legacy partition cannot start before CHS 0/1/1.  This disk's parameters are 38913 cylinders, 255 heads (tracks) per cylinder, and 63 sectors/track.  LBA sector numbers are zero-based, so CHS 0/1/1 is equivalent to LBA-63--the "offset" shown in the partition table.

Having been created with a legacy utility, the first partition ends on the boundary between cylinder 5 and 6, offset 96390 sectors (63+96327) from the partition table.  Note that one cylinder is 16065 sectors (255*63), and 6 full cylinders (cyls 0-5) would be 96390 sectors (16065*6).  All the numbers fit.

A legacy partitioner would start the second partition at CHS 6/0/1, or LBA-96390 (and that's what you'd see on the old XP systems).  However, the second partition was created with the Vista partitioner.  The Vista partitioner interpets partition-1 as ending in the middle of a 2048-sector block:  96390/2048 = 47.07 blocks.  So partition-2 is created beginning with the next full block.  48*2048=98304, so the next full block begins on the 98305th sector, which is 98304 sectors offset from the first sector, where the partition table is.  In CHS terms, the 98305th sector (LBA-98304 in the zero-based LBA enumeration) translates to CHS 6/30/25:  (6*16065)+(30*63)+25 = 98305.  But remember, the Vista partitioner--and the Vista OS--don't care about imaginary CHS boundaries.

You can do the math for the rest of the numbers:

Partition-2 ends at LBA-sector 21,069,824 (98304+20971520), and 21069824/2048=10,288 full blocks.

Partition-3 begins at offset 21,069,824, and ends at 343,117,824 (21069824+322048000), which is 167,538 full blocks into the disk.

Partition-4 begins at offset 343,117,824 and ends at 625,139,712, which is 305,244 full blocks into the disk.

Now, realize that partition-4 is an extended partition (type 0F).  That means the primary partition table actually points to an extended partition table, which precedes the logical partition itself.  So, "partition-4", which begins on LBA-343117824, is actually another partition table.  The logical partition begins one block later--an offset of 2048 sectors from the extended partition table, not from the primary partition table.  (FTR, a legacy partitioner would have placed the logical partition 63 sectors after the extended partition table.)

Ghost4me should note that the PartInfo report does not show the extended partition in the "Boot Sector Information" part of the report, it shows the logical volume that is within the extended partition.  Hence, the 2048 "Hidden Sectors" and the file system ID of 0x07.  IOW, there is no inconsistency between ptedit and PartInfo, as long as you understand what they are showing you.

As for why an image of the original 2048-offset partition restores as a 63-offset partition, consider the partitioner.  When you restore an image on a blank disk, Ghost must create a partition first, then fill it with the contents of the image.  Ghost is the partitioner.  And it's creating partitions the legacy way.  But, again, it doesn't matter to the OS.



 
 
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #7 - Sep 30th, 2007 at 9:47am
 
Dan Goodell

Excellent explanation--very enlightening.



Ghost4me

Quote:
1. I deleted the partitions in XP, so it was empty.

Well, that space on the HDD was converted to *unallocated* space, but you later say:

Quote:
I have another partition on the physical hard drive.

So, the HDD has a layout structure, the MBR was present and occupies the absolute sector 0, and the boot region of sectors 0 thru 62 (total of 63) is present on the HDD--so it is not a *virgin* empty HDD.

Quote:
* Restore MBR was NOT checked.

When doing a *Partition* restore to a HDD with an existing partition structure--my experience with other versions of Ghost has been that it, by default, will refuse to alter the existing MBR, except to update the Master Partition Table if the layout has been altered as far as starting and stopping addresses of the partitions.

Quote:
* There was an option called "Restore original disk signature".

I think that's one of the alterations to the default settings if you want to use Ghost 2003 to save and restore a Vista partition without using the *bcdedit* changes to the new Vista boot setup.

Quote:
* In fact, I couldn't modify any of the options.

Those are probably the needed settings to avoid having a boot failure when restoring a Vista partition!

Quote:
Conclusion:  I had expected to have needed to perform a Vista boot repair or edit the bcd because the "restore MBR" option was not checked.  I assume that Ghost 12 must have automatically written a MBR on the drive. At any rate, Ghost 12 obviously understood the Vista drive layout during the restore.

The drive already had the boot region present with a MBR--because the option to restore the MBR could not be selected, I doubt Ghost 12 wrote a new MBR--just updated the Master Partition Table because you changed the partition layout by restoring your backup to that unallocated space.

Quote:
In the past, it was necessary to edit boot.ini to "fix up" the boot process so it works.  Now Ghost 12 took care of everything automatically.

Yes, for WinXP--but now Vista no longer has the *boot.ini* file--but glad to see Ghost 12 handled the restore of Vista without a hitch!
 

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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #8 - Sep 30th, 2007 at 10:04am
 
Dan, thanks for your extensive comments!  

NightOwl --
Quote:
Quote:
1. I deleted the partitions in XP, so it was empty.
Well, that space on the HDD was converted to *unallocated* space, but you later say:
Quote:
I have another partition on the physical hard drive.
So, the HDD has a layout structure, the MBR was present and occupies the absolute sector 0, and the boot region of sectors 0 thru 62 (total of 63) is present on the HDD--so it is not a *virgin* empty HDD.

The HDD was never a boot HDD.  It was used as a data HDD with XP.  I used the XP Disk Manager to delete the partitions, but never wiped the drive etc.  I wanted to see what Ghost would do with an empty (not virgin) XP HDD.

Quote:
Quote:
* In fact, I couldn't modify any of the options.
Those are probably the needed settings to avoid having a boot failure when restoring a Vista partition!

I think it was my fault I couldn't modify any of the options.  I was using a PS2 keyboard connected to a PS2/serial add-in card on the Dell pc.  I'm guessing that the Ghost 12 Boot CD didn't recognize the keyboard; and thus I couldn't modify the settings.  I haven't retried it yet.

Quote:
Quote:
In the past, it was necessary to edit boot.ini to "fix up" the boot process so it works.  Now Ghost 12 took care of everything automatically.
Yes, for WinXP--but now Vista no longer has the *boot.ini* file--but glad to see Ghost 12 handled the restore of Vista without a hitch!

It appears that the BCD (or maybe it is Vista) is more intelligent--I took the one Vista boot partition (the third one in order) from a HDD that had four partitions and restored it as the ONLY partition on another HDD and it booted.  Again the other HDD had never been booted before, so I don't know who wrote the boot code on the HDD.  I never told XP in the past to make it bootable.

(It would be nice if Symantec provided some technical details of what Ghost 12 is actually doing in different scenarios; of course that would ruin the fun of users just speculating... )
 

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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #9 - Sep 30th, 2007 at 3:55pm
 
I'm happy that the Vista restore just worked so easily.

In the True Image forum, Mustang commented on Ghost 12 ...

Quote:
both Norton Ghost 12 and Symantec Backup Exec 7 Desktop Edition are able to handle the Vista 2048 sector partition offset. No repair is needed and the 2048 sector offset is maintained after the restore.


The 2048 sector offset wasn't relevant in Ghost4me's test and Dan explains why we don't need be so concerned with the offset anyway. But not having to do a BCD repair is a big advantage with any imaging software.

In this forum we haven't had many reports on restoring Vista images with Ghost 12. Thanks Ghost4me.
 
 
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #10 - Oct 1st, 2007 at 8:37am
 
Dan Goodell wrote on Sep 30th, 2007 at 5:39am:
...As for why an image of the original 2048-offset partition restores as a 63-offset partition, consider the partitioner.  When you restore an image on a blank disk, Ghost must create a partition first, then fill it with the contents of the image.  Ghost is the partitioner.  And it's creating partitions the legacy way.  But, again, it doesn't matter to the OS.


Brian, from the quote above, it seems that all the True Image unbootable problems are NOT Vista related but partitioner-related.  The causes of these seem to be bugs in the way True Image creates or modifies the partitions as part of the Vista restores.

Do you agree with that conclusion?  I know we have both been following several of the long threads in the True Image forums regarding Vista offset and BCD editing and repair issues with TI.
 

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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #11 - Oct 1st, 2007 at 12:16pm
 
Brian, how does ShadowProtect Desktop 3.0 handle this situation with Windows Vista?
 

ple • o • nasm n. “The use of more words than are required to express an idea”
 
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #12 - Oct 1st, 2007 at 3:43pm
 
Ghost4me,

I do agree it's a TI problem. If you image a 2048 sector offset Vista partition with True Image 10 and 11 and then restore the images, you get two different results. With TI 10 the offset is changed to 63 and the OS requires a repair to boot (missing winload.exe error). With TI 11 the offset is changed to 63 and the OS boots without a repair.

Pleonasm, I don't have Vista and I haven't read any reports about how ShadowProtect handles a Vista restore.

Ghost4me, do you have any spare time? It looks like you are the only member able to do any testing with Ghost 12 and Vista. I'd be interested to hear if the restore choices are greyed out again. I've done lots of restores with WinXP and the choices are always available. I'd also be interested to hear how Ghost 12 handles restoring a 2048 sector offset image to a zeroed (wiped) HD.
 
 
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #13 - Oct 1st, 2007 at 8:24pm
 
Brian wrote on Oct 1st, 2007 at 3:43pm:
I'd also be interested to hear how Ghost 12 handles restoring a 2048 sector offset image to a zeroed (wiped) HD.

I plan to retest with usb keyboard and wiped sata drive.  I haven't found a wipe utility yet that comes with a boot cd AND works with SATA drive. I think the Seagate DOS utility will work with SATA on the Dell pc, but haven't tried it yet.  It didn't work on the other pc with SATA.
 

Ghost4me  Ghost 9, 10, 12, 14, 15.  Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7
 
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Re: Ghost 12 restore results with Vista
Reply #14 - Oct 1st, 2007 at 8:48pm
 
 
 
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