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Rad: wired connections, using the home's pre-existing electrical wiring (Read 32912 times)
MrMagoo
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Re: Rad: wired connections, using the home's pre-existing electrical wiring
Reply #30 - Apr 22nd, 2009 at 7:17pm
 
I've seen a few new Coax to Ethernet adapters trickling onto the market.  They claim speeds of up to 270 Mb/s. 

If you are wondering how coax fits into our discussion of bandwidth above, it is a shared medium - very similar to your electrical wiring.  However, unlike your electrical wiring, Coax IS designed to carry data like this, and is very good at it.  There would be very little noise on the Coax in the frequencies the data is using (unless your cable company is doing something strange.)

I expect these adapters to perform well, but at their current price I won't be implementing them anytime soon in my house.

http://www.netgear.com/Products/PowerlineNetworking/Coax/MCAB1001.aspx
 
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thorin
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Re: Rad: wired connections, using the home's pre-existing electrical wir
Reply #31 - May 4th, 2009 at 9:25pm
 
I understand that you should not plug the powerline units into a power strip because of filtering.  I would assume the same thing would apply to a UPS - am I correct?

If I am, then, I guess, this would be another reason to wire the rooms.  Power goes out frequently where I live in Dallas and I like to be able to work for 15 - 20 minutes before I decide the power won't be right back on and have to shut down.
 

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MrMagoo
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Re: Rad: wired connections, using the home's pre-existing electrical wir
Reply #32 - May 6th, 2009 at 6:38pm
 
thorin wrote on May 4th, 2009 at 9:25pm:
I would assume the same thing would apply to a UPS - am I correct?

Yes, you are correct.  In fact, a UPS would have a much bigger effect, especially a higher end UPS, which cleans all the noise out of the electrical signal.  Along with the noise, it is likely to eliminate your network traffic right out.  I have heard of people successfully running powerline adapters off an electrical strip, and a lower end UPS should be no different, but it is not the "recommended" setup.

thorin wrote on May 4th, 2009 at 9:25pm:
this would be another reason to wire the rooms

If you can wire the rooms, that is going to be the best option.  There are lots of reasons to do it, and the connection is magnitudes better than any alternative in many ways.  Even the cost is often comparable to most of the alternatives, although wireless is starting to get pretty cheap.

 
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thorin
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Re: Rad: wired connections, using the home's pre-existing electrical wir
Reply #33 - May 8th, 2009 at 5:12am
 
Thanks MrMagoo,

Guess I had better get into the attic before the Dallas heat takes hold!
 

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Re: Rad: wired connections, using the home's pre-existing electrical wir
Reply #34 - Oct 2nd, 2009 at 11:21pm
 
I dont know if i am doing this right, but here it goes (someone please help me figure this out).....

WARNING:::::: i have a lot of questions...... on this subject...... (please help).......

[color=#ff000[size=11]0]Have a Sony Vaio (XP) with Intel Wirelss PRO ........ can get service from house .... person with service is UNKNOWN and dont know the distance .... and is on the 802.11g and another is 802.11b (signal is at 1 bar, which is low, but can get it)
BUT.....................
Have a Dell with a wireless (1397 802.11g mini half card)....... can NOT get signal to connect with this (states that signal is TOO weak, eventhough it has 1 bar TOO)........ again, dont know the person and/or how far the signal is comming from...
[/size][/color]

NOW, i have an adapter (802.11N) which ONLY works on the DELL, but NOT on the SONY.
WHY does it do that?

Another question: i have been told about a "repeater"/signal expander??? and that this could be of better value.....
Then i have been told that FIRST I have to know they type of ROUTER that the other person has and use the same type and/or configure it..... true/not????

Also, what is the difference btwn 802.11 - G and N???

Would it be wise to stick with the adapter (N) or to get a "repeater" (and would I have to know all that information first before I set it up).
I would like something that has mobility and convience.... Do I have the right one?

(Sorry, one more question......=====  Is it true that if i got a "G" it would work on any, such as b,g,a,etc BUT since I have a "N" it will only work with g's or b's)

I am truely baffled with this. I just thought that once I purchased the DELL , it would work like the SONY wireless card........ easy......... guess not....... please give me some suggestions.... thank you sooooooooooooooo much....
 
 
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MrMagoo
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Re: Rad: wired connections, using the home's pre-existing electrical wir
Reply #35 - Oct 3rd, 2009 at 2:30am
 
Sounds like you need to read through the guide and then let us know what questions you have:

http://guides.radified.com/magoo/guides/wireless/wireless_networking_01.htm
 
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Dan Goodell
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Re: Rad: wired connections, using the home's pre-existing electrical wir
Reply #36 - Apr 14th, 2011 at 6:27am
 
For anyone who might be looking in on this old thread, here's a recent article extolling some of the virtues of powerline adapters:

The secret sauce: powerline network adapters


 
 
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